Sensors

Electrical engineers have invented an inexpensive printed sensor that can monitor the tread of car tires in real time, warning drivers when the rubber meeting the road has grown dangerously thin.
by Duke University
10:27am
6.15.2017
A study offers new evidence that electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, are potentially as harmful as tobacco cigarettes.
by Colin Poitras, University of Connecticut
10:35am
6.13.2017
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A small, thin square of an organic plastic that can detect disease markers in breath or toxins in a building’s air could soon be the basis of portable, disposable sensor devices.
by Liz Ahlberg Touchstone, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
10:24am
5.19.2017
Researchers develop digital contact lenses that has the potential to transform medical care.
by Joo Hyeon Heo, UNIST
10:16am
5.4.2017
Technology could help doctors take guesswork out of physical exams.
by UC San Diego
10:37am
4.21.2017
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New innovation to be trialed within 12 months.
by Catrin Newman, Swansea University
9:33am
4.21.2017
A new adhesive sensor that costs around a dollar can save patients the discomfort and pain resulting from leaky intravenous drips.
by A*STAR
11:27am
4.17.2017
This new sensor with transparent features is capable of generating an electrical signal based on the sensed touch actions, and also consumes far less electricity than conventional pressure sensors.
by UNIST
11:59am
4.6.2017
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Nanoscale fiber-integrated X-ray sensor opens new doors for precision x-rays detection via endoscopy.
by The Optical Society
12:53pm
3.30.2017
In a special, dust-free, clean laboratory, a group of physicists spend their time probing hand-sized hexagons of silicon made of individual sensors. Together with layers of metal, the sensors will form a new subdetector to replace part of the end-...
by Harriet Jarlett, CERN
11:08am
3.29.2017
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On the long journey from the fruit plantation to the retailer's shelf, fruits can quickly perish. A new sensor looks like a piece of fruit and acts like a piece of fruit — but is actually a spy.
by Cornelia Zogg, Empa
10:57am
3.22.2017
Mercury is harmful even in small amounts. Detecting it currently requires expensive equipment. Researchers are working on a faster and cheaper alternative: a portable sensor that can perform a rapid analysis in the field. The key is finding...
by National Institute for Materials Science
10:18am
3.8.2017
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Potassium-sensitive fluorescence imaging shines light on chemical activity within the brain.
by SPIE
12:18pm
3.6.2017
New sensor could reveal the neurotransmitter’s role in learning and habit formation.
by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office
11:48am
3.3.2017
The device is similar to breathalyzers used by police officers when they suspect a driver of DUI. A patient simply exhales into the device, which uses semiconductor sensors like those in a household carbon monoxide detector.
by Jeremy Agor, University of Texas at Arlington
10:25am
2.1.2017
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Researchers have developed a wearable, wireless sensor that can monitor a person’s skin hydration for use in applications that need to detect dehydration before it poses a health problem. The device is lightweight, flexible, and stretchable, and has...
by Matt Shipman, NC State University
11:50am
1.31.2017
Modified carbon nanotubes could be used to track protein production by individual cells.
by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office
9:35am
1.24.2017
Device helps visually impaired to sense their environment.
by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland
10:09am
1.10.2017
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The sensor device could fill major gap in IBD diagnosis and treatment by helping to distinguish disease subtype and inform a personalized approach to treatment.
by The Optical Society
11:00am
1.9.2017
Exploiting a process known as molecular self-assembly, chemical engineers have built three-dimensional arrays of antibodies that could be used as sensors to diagnose diseases such as malaria or tuberculosis.
by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office
11:59am
1.4.2017
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A biologist and a materials scientist have teamed up to unravel the biological forces at play within our bodies. The first phase: feeding nanoparticles to worms.
by Taylor Kubota, Stanford University
11:14am
1.3.2017
Controls engineers at UC San Diego have developed practical strategies for building and coordinating scores of sensor-laden balloons within hurricanes.
by UC San Diego
11:18am
12.28.2016
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Researchers trace neural activity by using quantum sensors.
by Peter Reuell, Harvard University
11:00am
12.20.2016
Clinical breast examinations can save women’s lives, but, as doctors-in-training, new residents sometimes aren’t thorough or experienced enough to detect potentially cancerous abnormalities. Now, future physicians could learn to give high-quality...
by Sam Million-Weaver, University of Wisconsin-Madison
10:41am
12.14.2016
A research group has devised a way for a soft robot to feel its surroundings internally, in much the same way humans do.
by Tom Fleischman, Cornell University
10:55am
12.12.2016
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Researchers have developed an innovative optical sensor using a conventional tape since it is a low-cost and flexible material that can be easily acquired at stationery shops and it can detect variations of the optical properties of a liquid when is...
by Universidad Politécnica de Madrid
10:39am
12.12.2016
The versatile, small, and sensitive sensor element is capable of measuring diverse molecules in the atmosphere and in liquids, including gas molecules and biomolecules.
by National Institute for Materials Science
10:57am
12.2.2016
Engineering team develops sensor technology that could have promising new applications.
by Jeff Sossamon, University of Missouri
10:46am
12.2.2016
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