Medical Devices

A team of Vanderbilt University engineers have combined the science of biomechanics and advances in wearable tech to create a smart, mechanized undergarment. Their device got its U.S. debut Aug. 8-11 at an American Society of Biomechanics conference...
by Vanderbilt University
1:35pm
8.17.2017
One downside to medical sensors that test human sweat: you have to sweat. But researchers at the University of Cincinnati have come up with a novel way to stimulate sweat glands on a small, isolated patch of skin so subjects can stay cool and...
by University of Cincinnati
11:48am
8.7.2017
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Researchers in Ireland have taken a major step forward in the battle against medical implant infections.
by IOP Publishing
10:46am
6.20.2017
The strongest yet hybrid silk fibers have been created by scientists using all renewable resources. Combining spider silk proteins with nanocellulose from wood, the process offers a low-cost and scalable way to make bioactive materials for a wide...
by David Callahan, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
10:31am
5.18.2017
Prescription drugs have enabled millions of Americans with chronic medical conditions to live longer and more fulfilling lives, but many promising new drugs never make it to the human trials stage due to the potential for cardiac toxicity.
by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
12:15pm
5.12.2017
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Scientists have designed a supercapacitor that could make pacemakers and other instruments safer and more durable.
by Meghan Steele Horan, UCLA
9:56am
5.12.2017
Undergraduates rapidly prototype biomedical devices on a 3D metal printer.
by Ken Kingery, Duke University
10:06am
5.3.2017
Stricter rules to ensure that medical devices such as breast or hip implants are traceable and comply with EU patient safety requirements were backed by members of the European Parliament this week.
by European Parliament
10:05am
4.12.2017
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Transparent biosensors embedded into contact lenses could soon allow doctors and patients to monitor blood glucose levels and a host of other telltale signs of disease without invasive tests.
by American Chemical Society
11:24am
4.6.2017
Glass can bend over and over again on a nanoscale.
by Todd Hollingshead, Brigham Young University
12:55pm
3.27.2017
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Researchers use novel low-power laser etching technique based on recycled CD player to make polymer waveguides.
by The Optical Society
10:23am
3.23.2017
The discovery is a step towards developing new preventive strategies that could have a direct impact on the recovery of patients in the immediate aftermath of a surgical operation.
by Trinity College Dublin
12:00am
3.21.2017
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Rapid glucose measuring and precise multistep drug delivery.
by Kim Carol, Institute for Basic Science
11:27am
3.14.2017
The new antimicrobial silicone could prove extremely useful both for household and medical purposes.
by Kaunas University of Technology
10:31am
2.28.2017
Microfluidics, electronics, and inkjet technology underlie a newly developed all-in-one biochip that can analyze cells for research and clinical applications.
by Stanford University
12:15pm
2.7.2017
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A new technique could form the basis of a small, inexpensive point-of-care device for early disease diagnosis.
by Ken Kingery, Duke University
1:29pm
1.27.2017
The discovery, if commercialized, could lead to faster test results for HIV, Lyme disease, syphilis, rotavirus, and other infectious conditions.
by University of Central Florida
12:03pm
1.24.2017
Medical implants like stents, catheters, and tubing introduce risk for blood clotting and infection — a perpetual problem for many patients. Engineers offer a potential solution: A specially grown, “superhemophobic” titanium surface that’s extremely...
by Anne Ju Manning, Colorado State University
11:25am
1.19.2017
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System holds promise for the study of biological systems, biosensors, and bio-hybrid devices.
by University of Maryland
10:39am
1.18.2017
Bioengineers have developed an ultra-low-cost, human-powered blood centrifuge. With rotational speeds of up to 125,000 revolutions per minute, the device separates blood plasma from red cells in 1.5 minutes — no electricity required.
by Kris Newby, Stanford University
10:12am
1.17.2017
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