Electronics

A major step has been taken towards linking electrical and magnetic material properties, which is crucial for possible applications in electronics.
by Technische Universität Wien
10:32am
1.18.2018
“Trion” may sound like the name of one of the theoretical particles blamed for mucking up operations aboard the Starship Enterprise. But believe it or not, trions are real — and they may soon play a key role in electronic devices.
by Kara Manke, Duke University
10:57am
1.17.2018
Advertisement
Wavy transistors that vertically gain width without increasing their on-chip footprint could drive future flexible displays.
by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
10:04am
1.15.2018
Researchers have developed the world's first complementary electrochemical logic circuits that can function stably for long periods in water.
by Monica Westman Svenselius, Linköping University
11:38am
1.12.2018
Researchers demonstrate the existence of a new kind of magnetoresistance involving topological insulators.
by University of Minnesota
10:35am
1.10.2018
Advertisement
To connect components with each other, gluing is preferred instead of welding, riveting, or using screws. The requirements placed on the adhesive are high, though, so researchers have developed an adhesive which can be simultaneously hard and soft.
by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft
10:46am
1.5.2018
An easy and reliable assembly approach, inspired by building blocks, challenges the current fabrication of electronic systems.
by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
10:46am
12.29.2017
The technique can use multiple metals and substrates and is compatible with existing manufacturing systems that employ direct printing technologies.
by Matt Shipman, North Carolina State University
11:22am
12.22.2017
Advertisement
The findings could lead to new types of computer chips that could be much more powerful than those found in today’s computers and smart phones.
by University of St Andrews
9:51am
11.28.2017
Molecular magnetism packs power.
by David Tenenbaum, University of Wisconsin-Madison
12:43pm
11.14.2017
Advertisement
Advertisement
Electronics and light don’t go well together on a standard “CMOS” chip. Researchers have introduced a light connection into the heart of a semiconductor chip. In this way, two circuits can be isolated and still communicate. Or: the worlds of...
by University of Twente
10:32am
11.9.2017
Light-based devices could be used as biomedical sensors or as flexible connectors for electronics.
by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office
8:22am
11.8.2017
Advertisement
The new memory technology can be applied to non-conventional substrates, such as plastics and papers, to demonstrate its feasibility over a wide range of applications.
by KAIST
12:10pm
11.7.2017
The quest to develop ever-faster and more powerful computers has led to one of the most rudimentary methods of counting being given a 21st century make-over.
by University of Exeter
9:39am
11.2.2017
High-performance electrodes for lithium-ion batteries can be improved by paying closer attention to their defects — and capitalizing on them.
by Rice University
9:29am
10.30.2017
Advertisement
The increasing miniaturization in electronics will result in components which consist of only a few molecules, or even just one molecule. Tiny wires are required to connect these to an electrical circuit at the nano level.
by Kiel University
9:11am
10.30.2017
A team of scientists has discovered a way to induce and control a fundamental electrical switching behavior on the nano-scale.
by University of Liverpool
1:09pm
10.24.2017
Researchers have used liquid metal to create two-dimensional materials no thicker than a few atoms that have never before been seen in nature. The incredible breakthrough will not only revolutionize the way we do chemistry but could be applied to...
by James Giggacher, RMIT University
12:30pm
10.23.2017
Advertisement
A new method that precisely measures the mysterious behavior and magnetic properties of electrons flowing across the surface of quantum materials could open a path to next-generation electronics.
by Oak Ridge National Laboratory
10:34am
10.16.2017
By finding materials that act in ways similar to the mechanisms that biology uses to retain and process information, scientists hope to find clues to help us build smarter computers.
by Savannah Mitchem, Argonne National Laboratory
11:38am
10.11.2017
Advertisement
Advertisement
Researchers are a step closer to harnessing single pulses of light called solitons, using tiny ring-shaped microresonators, in findings that could aid efforts to develop advanced sensors, high-speed optical communications, and research tools.
by Emil Venere, Purdue University
11:53am
10.10.2017
Researchers are first to demonstrate a circulator on a silicon chip at mm-wave frequencies that enables nonreciprocal transmission of waves: device could enable two-way radios and transform 5g networks, self-driving cars, and virtual reality.
by Columbia Engineering
11:08am
10.6.2017
Advertisement
Magnetic data storage has long been considered too slow for use in the working memories of computers. Researchers have now investigated a technique by which magnetic data writing can be done considerably faster and using less energy.
by Oliver Morsch, ETH Zürich
9:54am
9.8.2017
Almost every process in pharmaceutical and biotechnology manufacturing uses some sort of computerized system. With this increasing use of computerized systems comes the increase in the amount of data generated by those systems.
by Piritta Maunu
4:51pm
8.30.2017
While cars powered by hydrogen fuel cells offer clear advantages over the electric vehicles that are growing in popularity, they have yet to take off with consumers.
by Worcester Polytechnic Institute
10:02am
8.29.2017
Advertisement
This exciting finding paves the way for high-frequency ultrafast electromechanical switches and sensors.
by Tokyo Institute of Technology
9:51am
8.29.2017
From smartphones to supercomputers, the growing need for smaller and more energy efficient devices has made higher density data storage one of the most important technological quests.
by University of Manchester
8:05am
8.24.2017
The data acquired can be used by chemists to develop more accurate computational methods regarding transition metal chemical bonding.
by American Institute of Physics
12:24pm
8.22.2017
Advertisement
Researchers report preliminary results suggesting that under simulated landfill conditions, quantum dots can leach out of devices. But because this happens in such tiny amounts, the team says that in the grand scheme of things, it might make sense...
by American Chemical Society
11:02am
8.21.2017
Chemists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a new method to more safely and, by extension, easily produce these shear films, which change their color with the help of a tiny electric current. This could make them available to many...
by Georgia Institute of Technology
1:27pm
8.17.2017
Advertisement
Advertisement
As electronic devices continue to shrink to meet the demand for pocket-sized and wearable technology, scientists are working to develop the minute components that make them work. A team at the University of Nottingham have developed a new approach...
by University of Nottingham
1:42pm
8.16.2017
New technology, resistive random access memory (RRAM), could form the basis of a better kind of nonvolatile computer memory, where data is retained even when the power is off.
by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
10:38am
8.9.2017
Advertisement
At IBM Research, scientists are exploring the nanoscale to improve the power density and energy efficiency of electronic devices, including everything from mobile phones to IoT sensors to giant cloud data centers.
by IBM
1:33pm
8.3.2017
Advanced plastics could usher in lighter, cheaper, more energy-efficient product components, including those used in vehicles, LEDs and computers—if only they were better at dissipating heat. A new technique that can change plastic's molecular...
by University of Michigan
1:26pm
8.2.2017
Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced the first known material capable of single-photon emission at room temperature and at telecommunications wavelengths.
by Los Alamos National Laboratory
10:12am
8.1.2017
Advertisement
Electronics are constantly getting smaller. A major reason for this miniaturization is the development of nano-size resonators, which convert small levels of electrical power into mechanical oscillations at high frequencies.
by Osaka University
1:24pm
7.31.2017
New research has shown that the granular building blocks in copper can never fit together perfectly, but are rotated causing an unexpected level of misalignment and surface roughness.
by Amber Centre
10:22am
7.28.2017
Physicists have found a way to write an electrical circuit into a crystal, opening up the possibility of transparent, three-dimensional electronics that, like an Etch A Sketch, can be erased and reconfigured.
by Eric Sorenson, Washington State University
10:14am
7.28.2017
Advertisement
Topological insulators, a class of materials which has been investigated for just over a decade, have been heralded as a new 'wonder material,' as has graphene.
by University of Groningen
9:56am
7.28.2017
Cellphones may soon be able to handle the extreme heat of a beach day or frigid cold of a day at the ski slopes.
1:56pm
7.27.2017
Advertisement
Advertisement