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The discovery, if commercialized, could lead to faster test results for HIV, Lyme disease, syphilis, rotavirus, and other infectious conditions.
by University of Central Florida
1.24.2017
12:03pm
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Biomedical engineers report they have worked out a noninvasive way to release and deliver concentrated amounts of a drug to the brain of rats in a temporary, localized manner using ultrasound.
by Johns Hopkins Medicine
1.24.2017
11:19am
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The technique could be used to manufacture components for a range of military and commercial applications.
by Emil Venere, Purdue University
1.24.2017
9:55am
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Modified carbon nanotubes could be used to track protein production by individual cells.
by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office
1.24.2017
9:35am
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In case you missed it (ICYMI), here are some of the stories that made headlines in the world of cleanrooms and nanotechnology in the past week.
1.23.2017
1:41pm
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Self-assembling particles show promise for LED lighting.
by Chris Emery, Office of Engineering Communications, Princeton University
1.23.2017
12:46pm
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A research team has demonstrated an on-chip sensor capable of detecting unprecedentedly small frequency changes.
by The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
1.23.2017
12:10pm
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A team of scientists has compositionally modified magnetite to capture visible sunlight and convert this light energy into electrical current. This current may be useful to drive the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen.
by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
1.23.2017
11:45am
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A computational approach uncovers the best materials to coat cathodes of lithium-ion batteries.
by Amanda Morris, Northwestern University
1.23.2017
11:24am
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New success for physicists in studying the quantum vacuum.
by Universität Konstanz
1.23.2017
11:14am
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KROHNE Inc. offers the OPTIFLUX 4000 electromagnetic flowmeter, which is suitable for pulp and paper industry applications, including chemical dosing, bleaching, coloring, and black liquor processing.
1.23.2017
6:13am
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Optical fibers are the backbone of modern communications, shuttling information from A to B through thin glass filaments as pulses of light. They are used extensively in telecommunications, allowing information to travel at near the speed of light...
by Joint Quantum Institute
1.20.2017
12:17pm
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A recent study has demonstrated the first important step toward integrating atomically precise graphene nanoribbons onto nonmetallic substrates.
by Maeve Reilly, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
1.20.2017
12:05pm
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A new type of adhesive that combines the bonding chemistry of shellfish with a bio-based polymer has been shown to perform as well as commercially available products and can be easily degraded, representing a potential non-toxic alternative.
by Emil Venere, Purdue University
1.20.2017
11:48am
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Nanomaterials can store all kinds of things, including energy, drugs, and other cargo.
by Megan Fellman, Northwestern University
1.20.2017
11:19am
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Terra Universal's EZ-UP Cleanroom Internal-Frame modular enclosure with HEPA fan/filter units is ISO-7 compliant; ULPA filters also available. The cleanroom system uses unique softwall vinyl panels that zipper together and fit over a steel frame.
1.19.2017
11:50am
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Medical implants like stents, catheters, and tubing introduce risk for blood clotting and infection — a perpetual problem for many patients. Engineers offer a potential solution: A specially grown, “superhemophobic” titanium surface that’s extremely...
by Anne Ju Manning, Colorado State University
1.19.2017
11:25am
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Since its discovery in 2004, scientists have believed that graphene may have the innate ability to superconduct. Now, researchers have found a way to activate that previously dormant potential.
by University of Cambridge
1.19.2017
11:10am
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Research that improves melting and solidification could lead to manufacturing that is more efficient and reliable.
by Matthew Chin, UCLA
1.19.2017
10:57am
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In a new study, researchers investigate why hair is incredibly strong and resistant to breaking. The findings could lead to the development of new materials for body armor and help cosmetic manufacturers create better hair care products.
by Liezel Labios, UC San Diego
1.19.2017
10:33am
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Research is helping to meet the challenge of incorporating nanoscale structures into future semiconductor devices that will create new technologies and impact on all aspects of everyday life.
by Swansea University
1.19.2017
10:14am
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In the future, it may be possible to use nanofibers to improve the attachment of bone implants, or the fibers may be used directly to scaffold bone regeneration. This may also enable treatments for osteoporosis.
by University of Helsinki
1.18.2017
12:28pm
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Research finds microbe from the Potomac yields better electronic material.
by Janet Lathrop, UMass Amherst
1.18.2017
12:04pm
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Scientists find a new way to remove defects from heat-resistant alloys.
by Pam Frost Gorder, Ohio State University
1.18.2017
11:43am
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In research that could one day lead to advances against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, engineering researchers have demonstrated a technique for precisely measuring the properties of individual protein molecules floating in...
by Gabe Cherry, University of Michigan
1.18.2017
11:22am
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System holds promise for the study of biological systems, biosensors, and bio-hybrid devices.
by University of Maryland
1.18.2017
10:39am
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Use the "B.O.L.D. Approach" to succeed in an unpredictable business world.
by Jill Johnson
1.18.2017
6:49am
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Based on a study of the optical properties of novel ultrathin semiconductors, researchers have developed a method for rapid and efficient characterization of these materials.
by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
1.17.2017
1:02pm
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Until recently, “flexible ferroelectrics” could have been thought of as the same type of oxymoronic phrase. However, scientists have pioneered a new class of materials with advanced functionalities that moves the idea from the realm of irony into reality.
by Argonne National Laboratory
1.17.2017
12:39pm
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Engineered nanometer- and micrometer-scale structures have a vast array of uses in electronics, sensors, and biomedical applications. Because these are difficult to fabricate, researchers are trying a bottom-up philosophy, which harnesses the natural...
by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
1.17.2017
10:56am
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Bioengineers have developed an ultra-low-cost, human-powered blood centrifuge. With rotational speeds of up to 125,000 revolutions per minute, the device separates blood plasma from red cells in 1.5 minutes — no electricity required.
by Kris Newby, Stanford University
1.17.2017
10:12am
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Scientists have developed a new sensor, which can rapidly and accurately detect tiny amounts of oligonucleotides related to diseases.
by University of Southampton
1.17.2017
9:51am
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BioSafe Cleanroom Windows, manufactured by Terra Universal, are designed as framed or frameless, offering the cleanest solutions to strict cleanliness requirements. Both window types are installed flush against the clean side of the wall, reducing...
1.17.2017
6:47am
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In case you missed it (ICYMI), here are some of the stories that made headlines in the world of cleanrooms and nanotechnology in the past week.
1.16.2017
12:39pm
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Through long shifts at the helm of a highly sophisticated microscope, researchers recorded reactions at near-atomic-scale resolution. Their success is another step toward building a better battery.
by Taylor Kubota, Stanford University
1.16.2017
12:11pm
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Nanoparticles from combustion engines can activate viruses that are dormant in lung tissue cells.
by Helmholtz Zentrum München
1.16.2017
11:48am
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Researchers have developed a soy-based air filter that can capture toxic chemicals, such as carbon monoxide and formaldehyde, that current air filters can’t.
by Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture, Washington State University
1.16.2017
11:20am
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The watch was made using a unique composite incorporating graphene to manufacture a strong but lightweight new case to house the delicate watch mechanism.
by University of Manchester
1.16.2017
10:52am
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Before a malignant tumor is developed, the immune system tries to fight against proteins that are altered during their formation, producing certain cancer antibodies. A new biosensor has been able to detect these defensive units in serum samples of...
by Complutense University of Madrid
1.16.2017
10:36am
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The HEMCO Corner Canopy Hood maximizes wasted space in corner areas. It is designed to capture and exhaust corrosive vapors, heat steam, and odors when mounted over areas that have water baths, hot plates or other lab equipment.
1.16.2017
9:34am
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