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The Lead

Making Health Care More Accessible with Paper Electronics

November 21, 2014 | News | Comments

Flexible electronic sensors based on paper — an inexpensive material — have the potential to cut the price of a wide range of medical tools, from helpful robots to diagnostic tests. Scientists have now developed a fast, low-cost way of making these sensors by directly printing conductive ink on paper.

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SPIE Advanced Lithography

February 22, 2015 12:00 am | Events

SPIE Advanced Lithography is the premier conference for the lithography community. For 40 years, SPIE has brought together this community to address challenges presented in fabricating next-generation integrated circuits. It will be held February 22-26, 2015.

SEMICON Korea

February 4, 2015 12:00 am | Events

The semiconductor technology event SEMICON Korea will be held from Feb. 4-6, 2015.

New Way to Determine Surface Properties at the Nanoscale

November 21, 2014 11:34 am | by John Davis, Texas Tech | News | Comments

Engineers have developed a method for characterizing the surface properties of materials at different temperatures at the nanoscale. Knowing properties of materials at different temperatures is important in engineering. For example, the rubber O-ring that failed during the 1986 space shuttle disaster serves at a tragic case study of what can go wrong when decision-makers don’t take this into account.

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Spiraling Light, Nanoparticles, and Insights Into Life’s Structure

November 21, 2014 12:00 am | by Nicole Casal Moore, University of Michigan | News | Comments

As hands come in left and right versions that are mirror images of each other, so do the amino acids and sugars within us. But unlike hands, only the left-oriented amino acids and the right-oriented sugars ever make into life as we know it. Scientists know the other varieties exist because when they synthesize these amino acids and sugars in a lab, roughly equal numbers of left- and right-facing arrangements form. But life prefers one.

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Electric Actuators

November 20, 2014 12:31 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Automation Service offers three series of Rotork electric actuators which are compatible with its line of remanufactured control valves.

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Nanosilver Can Upset the Gut

November 20, 2014 11:19 am | by Anne Craig, Communications Officer, Queen’s University | News | Comments

Nanosilver, which is often added to water purification units, can upset your gut. The discovery is important as people are being exposed to nanoparticles every day, in biomedical applications, toys, sunscreen, cosmetics, clothing, and other items. A synthetic stool called "rePOOPulate" was used to examine the impact of nanoparticles on the human gut.

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Nanosilver Can Upset the Gut

November 20, 2014 11:19 am | by Anne Craig, Communications Officer, Queen’s University | News | Comments

Nanosilver, which is often added to water purification units, can upset your gut. The discovery is important as people are being exposed to nanoparticles every day, in biomedical applications, toys, sunscreen, cosmetics, clothing, and other items. A synthetic stool called "rePOOPulate" was used to examine the impact of nanoparticles on the human gut.

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Quantum-dot Technology Makes TVs More Colorful

November 20, 2014 11:08 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT News Office | News | Comments

If LCD TVs start getting much more colorful — and energy-efficient — in the next few years, it will probably be thanks to MIT spinout QD Vision, a pioneer of quantum-dot television displays. Quantum dots are light-emitting semiconductor nanocrystals that can be tuned — by changing their size, nanometer by nanometer — to emit all colors across the visible spectrum.

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Micro-actuators Transport Materials in Liquids

November 20, 2014 10:41 am | by Fabio Bergamin, ETH Zurich | News | Comments

Researchers have developed improved forms of tiny magnetic actuators thanks to new materials and a microscopic 3D printing technology. Scientists have been conducting research on micrometer-sized actuators which one day may make it possible to transport drugs or chemical sensor molecules to specific locations throughout the human body.

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Molecular “Cage” Leads to Synthetic Vaccines

November 20, 2014 10:26 am | by Stuart Wolpert, UCLA | News | Comments

UCLA biochemists have created the largest-ever protein that self-assembles into a molecular “cage.” The research could lead to synthetic vaccines that protect people from the flu, HIV, and other diseases. At a size hundreds of times smaller than a human cell, it also could lead to new methods of delivering pharmaceuticals inside of cells, or to the creation of new nanoscale materials.

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Making Clean Energy 'Bio Batteries' From Bacteria

November 20, 2014 10:15 am | News | Comments

Researchers from the U.K. are a step closer to enhancing the generation of clean energy from bacteria. A published report shows how electrons hop across otherwise electrically insulating areas of bacterial proteins, and that the rate of electrical transfer is dependent on the orientation and proximity of electrically conductive “stepping stones.”

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Swabbable Pre-Slit Transfer Valve

November 19, 2014 1:39 pm | Qosina Corp. | Product Releases | Comments

Qosina offers its Swabbable Pre-Slit Transfer Valve, model 80191. The swabbable design can be used for injection or aspiration with a standard catheter tip syringe.

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Virtual Chemistry Set Discovers New Chemical Reactions

November 19, 2014 1:29 pm | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford University | News | Comments

A new computer model could identify unknown chemical mechanisms that could improve energy production and storage, or the development of new medicines. The nanoreactor works like a virtual chemistry set to discover new reactions and mechanisms.

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X-ray Milestone Reached

November 19, 2014 1:18 pm | News | Comments

An international team of scientists has developed a high-throughput method of imaging biological particles using an X-ray laser. The experimentrepresents a major milestone for studies of individual biological structures using X-ray lasers. The technique paves the way for 3D imaging of parts of the cell, and even small viruses, to develop a deeper understanding of life’s smallest units.

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Insulated Wall Systems Reduce Particulate Contamination

November 19, 2014 11:35 am | Cleanrooms by United | Articles | Comments

Modular construction provides advantages that reduce facility down time and onsite debris generated by general “stick build” construction, while providing a cost-effective alternative to conventional construction without compromising quality, durability or efficiency.

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